COVID RESPONSE IN PERU AND ARGENTINA: Dysfunctional Healthcare Systems and Management

Recently, the Institute for the Advanced Studies of the Americas (https://mia.as.miami.edu/) at the University of Miami held a revealing webinar with the participation and cogent presentations of former ministers of health of Peru and Argentina. The two ex-ministers know the internal weakness of the healthcare systems in their countries, and themselves had participated in attempts to make reforms.

There are several takeaways from the event:

  • Both Peru and Argentina have the highest rates of infection in Latin America along with Brazil.
  • Before even the COVID pandemic hit Peru and Argentine, the healthcare systems were dysfunctional and inaccessible.
  • Peru was late in acquiring internationally a low cost testing kit that failed and, therefore, the people didn’t know if they had COVID. Argentina was late in organizing testing.
  • The underlying situation in Argentina and Peru was one of great income, social and regional inequality that had the effect of separating a large share of the population from good healthcare and protection from the COVID.

8,000 Jumbo Jets to Deliver COVID Vaccine

Shipping a coronavirus vaccine around the world will be the “largest transport challenge ever” according to the airline industry. The equivalent of 8,000 Boeing 747s will be needed, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) has said.

Covid vaccine: 8,000 jumbo jets needed to deliver doses globally, says IATA – BBC News

IN SHORT “THE PRESIDENT IS A JERK”

QUOTE FROM EX-SEN CLAIRE MCCASKILL (MO) ON MORNING JOE (MSNBC)

THE PRESIDENT SAYS IF THE WE GAVE ARMS TO THE TALIBAN THEN IT’S OK THAT RUSSIA GIVES ARMS TO THE TALIBAN.

PRESIDENT MUST HAVE A FINANCIAL INTEREST IN hydroxychoroquine

Basic Economics of Trade Agreements (Krugman)

The case for free trade is about microeconomics, about raising efficiency. There’s no particular reason to think that trade liberalization is good for fixing problems of inadequate demand. I mean, you learn in Econ 101 that aggregate spending is Y = C+I+G+X-M; that is, consumer spending, plus investment spending, plus government purchases, plus exports, minus imports. Trade liberalization raises X, but it also raises M. For any individual county it can go either way; for the world as a whole it’s a wash, since total exports equal total imports.

via Wrong To Be Right – NYTimes.com.

Cuba’s MIlitary Dictatorship–A Lost Reform

Even the Chavez model seems neoliberal compared to the CubanMilitary-Based Economy.  The Cuba’s will not find much solace in these so-called “reforms.”  Sad but true for those who might have had some hope that there would be changes–I guess not in our lifetime

Raúl Castro’s consolidation of his position as successor to his brother Fidel confirms that his Cuba will give the military domestic hegemony, which makes any serious political or economic opening in the near future seemingly impossible. The Cuban Communist Party’s recent Sixth Congress reflected this, offering little new and rehashing a lot of the old.

via Has Cuba Lost its Last Chance? by Carlos Perez Llana – Project Syndicate.

A Special Welcome to International Delegations: Miami Council for International Visitors (MCIV)

Coral Gables is privileged to be the home of the Miami Council for International Visitors (MCIV;  www.miamiciv.org).  This premier local organization, which is a member of the National Council for International Visitor (NCIV), is host to delegations to the South Florida region from throughout the world, whose participants are here experiencing the culture, society, politics, economics and social dimensions of our great region and city.

These visitors’ activities are financed through the Department of State and NCIV, and the delegations are selected by our U.S. embassies in the world.  MCIV Miami is host to literally hundreds of visitors during the year and its “citizen diplomat” members of MCIV, host the visitors in their homes, offices and work places.

For those interested in becoming “citizen diplomats,” collaborating with MCIV and meeting these international visitors, you can contact Annette Alvarez, Executive Director MCIV, through their website at http://www.miamiciv.org.

Long-Term Economic Impact of Japan Disaster Is Likely Smaller Than Thought

This explains that the actual permanent impact of significant disasters have been relative less than thought and that is likely to be the case in Japan.

…while the fear is understandable, this may turn out to have been an overreaction: history suggests that, despite the terrifying destruction and the horrific human toll, the long-term impact of the quake on the Japanese economy could be surprisingly small.

via Japan and the Economics of Natural Disasters : The New Yorker.