Fl Development Management is Dead

Gov. Scott Signs Damaging HB 7207

Without fanfare, on Thursday, June 2 Gov. Scott signed into law the damaging HB 7207. Among other things, this sweeping growth management legislation virtually eliminates any meaningful state checks and balances over local government decisions, decimates citizens’ ability to effectively challenge decisions, and opens Florida’s rural lands for sprawling development. We thank the dedicated citizens who made numerous calls to their Legislators and the Governor to try to halt this attack on Florida’s quality of life.

Here is some recent newspaper coverage on this issue:

St. Petersburg Times — An obituary for Florida Growth Management, June 5, 2011

Sarasota Herald-Tribune — Gov. Rick Scott reverses 25 years of growth management policy, June 3, 2011.

Palm Beach Post — Growth management loses muscle, June 3, 2011.

Florida Current — DCA positions being filled even as department appears headed towards elimination, June 3, 2011.

Visit 1000 Friends at www.1000fof.org, on Facebook, or Twitter (@floridafriends) to find out the latest on growth management in Florida.

More On Gov. Scott Killing Florida’s Growth and Environmental Management

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Future Role of Florida’s Regional Planning Councils?

We now understand that when he signed the budget last week, Gov. Scott line-item vetoed $2.5 million of general revenue in state funding for Florida’s Regional Planning Councils. In return for a portion of this funding, every year the state’s 11 RPCs each enter into contracts with the Department of Community Affairs to provide specified regional planning services.

Effective July 1, the RPCs will no longer receive this funding and will need to determine what services they will provide for their state-mandated functions. It is important to note that this funding is typically a small portion of each RPC’s annual budget.

While HB 7207 made sweeping changes to many aspects of Florida’s growth management system, it left the statutory functions of the RPCs largely intact. How or if RPCs will interact with local governments on the review of comprehensive plans, amendments and Developments of Regional Impact (DRIs) as required by state law is unknown at this time.

On a related issue, the growth management bill HB 7207 was transmitted to the Governor’s Office last week and he has 15 days to sign it into law.

1000 Friends will continue to provide regular updates on the many changes to Florida’s growth management process brought about by the 2011 Legislature and Governor Scott. Please visit www.1000fof.org, and follow us on Facebook and Twitter (@floridafriends) for timely updates.

GOP cut crucial weather satellites with fierce hurricane season looming « Climate Progress

Earlier this year, Congressional Republicans decided accurate weather forecasting and hurricane tracking were services the American people could live without. The GOP-sponsored 2011 spending bill slashed the budget for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, slashing $700 million targeted for an overhaul of the nation’s aging environmental satellite system. NOAA scientists have stated unequivocally the existing satellites will fail and if they aren’t replaced, the agency’s ability to provide life-saving information to the American people will be compromised. Jane Lubchenco, NOAA administrator, told reporters yesterday that the agency’s hurricane outlook last year was “spot-on” and cautioned that “not having satellites and applying their latest capabilities could spell disaster“

via GOP cut crucial weather satellites with fierce hurricane season looming « Climate Progress.

We Will Pay Dearly For Nuclear Power in South Florida

Does it make any sense to keep expanding nuclear energy in South Florida.  As a consumer you will end up paying for the accelerating costs of nuclear reactors, without doubt.

In short, the more we learn about the dangers of nuclear energy, more costly it becomes.  How much would the Japanese pay to have avoided their nuclear disaster?

Drawing on largely unknown public records, the paper reveals for the first time both absolute as well as yearly and specific reactor costs and their evolution over time. Its most significant finding is that even this most successful nuclear scale-up was characterized by a substantial escalation of real-term construction costs.

via Does nuclear power have a negative learning curve? « Climate Progress.

Does nuclear power have a negative learning curve? « Climate Progress

Does it make any sense to keep expanding nuclear energy in South Florida.  As a consumer you will end up paying for the accelerating costs of nuclear reactors, without doubt.

Drawing on largely unknown public records, the paper reveals for the first time both absolute as well as yearly and specific reactor costs and their evolution over time. Its most significant finding is that even this most successful nuclear scale-up was characterized by a substantial escalation of real-term construction costs.

via Does nuclear power have a negative learning curve? « Climate Progress.